Tolnaftate vs Miconazole - Which Is Better For Jock Itch

Tolnaftate

It is an antifungal medication which fights infections caused by fungus.

Uses

This antifungal is commonly used to treat infections of the nails, palms, scalp, and soles of the feet.

In addition, it is used to treat – athlete’s foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (tinea corporis), and jock itch (tinea cruris).

Jock itch is a fungal infection which affects the skin of the inner thighs, genitals, and buttocks. It is more common in men than in women due to the fact that the presence of male genitalia leads to increased humidity and friction.

Common symptoms of tinea cruris include:

  • changes in skin color;
  • redness in the affected area;
  • a rash which doesn’t improve or even worsens with OTC hydrocortisone cream;
  • a rash which gets worse with activity or exercise;
  • cracking skin in the affected area;
  • burning sensation in the affected area;
  • persistent itching in the affected area.

Causes

This condition is caused by a type of fungus which can be spread from person to person or from shared use of contaminated clothing or towels.

Risk Factors

The fungus that causes jock itch thrives in damp, close environments. You are at greater risk of tinea cruris if you:

  • have type 2 diabetes;
  • are a man;
  • have a weakened immune system;
  • sweat heavily;
  • are overweight;
  • wear tight underwear – tight fabrics trap moisture against the skin and create a prime environment for fungus to grow;
  • are a teen.

Dosage

For fungus infections, apply to the affected area of the skin two times per day.

Note – if this antifungal gets in your eyes, mouth, nose, rectum, or vagina, rinse with water.

Side Effects and Precautions

Side effects may include:

  • mild dryness, itching, or peeling of treated skin.

Alcoholalcohol beer

This antifungal does not get absorbed into the body to a great extent, hence, drinking alcoholic beverages will probably not interfere with this medication.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known exactly whether this topical antifungal passes into breast milk or if it could negatively affect an infant. Tell your healthcare provider that you are breastfeeding before using this topical antifungal.

Also, it is not known precisely whether this topical antifungal will harm a developing fetus. Tell your healthcare professional if you are pregnant or plan to fall pregnant before using this product.

MiconazoleT

It belongs to the class of medications called azole antifungals.

This antifungal works by killing the yeast that is causing the infection.

Uses

This azole antifungal is commonly used for the treatment of pityriasis, a skin rash that is largely benign and causes lightening/darkening of the skin of the chest, legs, arms, and neck.

In addition, it is used experimentally as a hair restoration remedy for people who have experienced androgenic alopecia as well as for people who suffer from the sporadic shedding of hair.

Moreover, this medication is used for the treatment of skin infections, like – jock itch (a fungal infection in the inner thigh and buttocks), ringworm, athlete’s foot (tinea pedis), and other fungal infections.

Dosage

The azole antifungal comes as a vaginal cream, mouth gel, cream, and vaginal pessaries. Use the medication once per day at bedtime for 1 to 7 nights, depending on the product used and your condition.

Relief of symptoms should be noted within 3 days, and complete relief from infection should occur within seven days.

Continue to use this medication every day for the full time prescribed, even if symptoms disappear after a few days of treatment.

Notes – if the condition does not improve, contact your healthcare provider.

This azole antifungal is for use on the skin only. If you accidentally swallow some of it, go to the emergency room of your local hospital.

Also, make sure you do not spray the azole antifungal near the eyes. In case it happens, wash the eyes as soon as possible with cool water.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • sores on the tongue;
  • dry mouth;
  • redness and swelling of the gums;
  • change in taste;
  • nausea;
  • headaches;
  • itching skin;
  • loss of taste;
  • diarrhea.

Less common side effects may include:

  • unexplained weight loss;
  • loss of appetite;
  • weakness;
  • migraines;
  • chest pain;
  • upper abdominal or stomach pain;
  • abdominal or stomach pain.

Drug Interactionsantibiotics pill

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • ranolazine;
  • buspirone, an anxiolytic medication that is mainly used to treat generalized anxiety disorder;
  • rapaflo;
  • type 2 diabetes medicine;
  • carbamazepine, a medication used in the treatment of epilepsy and neuropathic pain;
  • disopyramide;
  • ciclosporin;
  • phenytoin (Dilantin);
  • cilostazol;
  • alprazolam, a medication mainly used for the treatment of anxiety disorders, panic disorders, and anxiety caused by depression;
  • rifabutin;
  • nateglinide;
  • microgestin;
  • reboxetine;
  • busulfan, a cell cycle non-specific alkylating antineoplastic agent;
  • an ergot medicine;
  • protease inhibitors for HIV infection;
  • tacrolimus;
  • calcium-channel blockers like felodipine or nifedipine;
  • blood thinner medicines, such as – warfarin (Coumadin);
  • phenytoin;
  • fosphenytoin;
  • gildess;
  • vyvanse;
  • dulera;
  • sirolimus, a macrolide compound that is mainly used to prevent organ transplant rejection.

Pregnancy & BreastfeedingM

It is not known exactly whether this topical antifungal passes into breast milk or if it could negatively affect an infant. Tell your healthcare provider that you are breastfeeding before using this topical antifungal.

Also, it is not known precisely whether this topical antifungal will harm a developing fetus. Tell your healthcare professional if you are pregnant or plan to fall pregnant before using this topical antifungal.

Alcohol

This product does not get absorbed into the body to a great extent, hence, drinking alcoholic beverages will probably not interfere with this medication.

Bottom Line – Tolnaftate vs Miconazole

Tolnaftate is an antifungal typically used for the treatment of mild to moderate tinea corporis (ringworm), tinea cruris (jock itch), tinea manuum, tinea pedis (athlete’s foot), and tinea versicolor.

Miconazole (brand name – Monistat) is an antifungal medication that is typically used to treat ringworm, pityriasis versicolor, and yeast infections of the skin or vagina.

In conclusion, both antifungals are effective for jock itch. Even their price is almost the same. Let your doctor decide which is best for you.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22125963
https://www.fda.gov/downloads/drugs/guidancecomplianceregul
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00004575

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