Uricalm vs Azo – Comparison of Side Effects & Uses

Uricalm

It is the brand name of a drug called phenazopyridine, which belongs to a group of medications known as urinary analgesics.

Mechanism of Action

This medication has a direct topical analgesic effect on the mucosa lining of the urinary tract.

Inactive Ingredients

Cranberry Fruit Powder, Cornstarch, FD&C Red No. 40 Lake, Croscarmellose Sodium, Hypromellose, FD&C Yellow No. 6 Lake, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Magnesium Stearate, Mineral Oil, Polyvinylpyrrolidone, Polyethylene Glycol, Silicon Dioxide, Talc, Pregelatinized Starch, Triacetin, and Titanium Dioxide.

Uses

It is used to treat urinary symptoms like pain, increased urination, and increased urge to urinate.

Dosage

The usual recommended dose is 2 tablets with water after meals as needed up to three times per day.

Notes – do not use this medication for longer than 2 days unless your healthcare provider has told you to.

It will most likely darken the color of your urine to a red color. This is a normal effect and is not harmful.

This medication will treat urinary symptoms, however, it will not treat a urinary tract infection.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • upset stomach;
  • dizziness;
  • a headache.

Rare side effects may include:

  • a purple appearance of the skin;
  • little or no urinating;
  • vomiting;
  • rapid weight gain;
  • nausea;
  • swelling;
  • stomach pain;
  • pale or yellowed skin;
  • pain in your lower back;
  • loss of appetite;
  • fever;
  • confusion.

Drug Interactionsdrugs pills

It may negatively interact with other drugs, especially:

  • Tylenol (acetaminophen);
  • Cymbalta (duloxetine);
  • hydrochlorothiazide;
  • gabapentin;
  • omeprazole;
  • Zyrtec (cetirizine);
  • Xanax (alprazolam);
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine);
  • clonazepam;
  • ibuprofen;
  • Lipitor (atorvastatin);
  • Lexapro (escitalopram);
  • melatonin;
  • spironolactone;
  • Synthroid (levothyroxine);
  • Cipro (ciprofloxacin);
  • metformin (type 2 diabetes medication).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

There are no well-done studies to determine the safety of this over-the-counter medication in pregnant women. Do not use this medication without a healthcare provider’s advice if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

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It is not known exactly whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could negatively affect a nursing infant. Do not use this over-the-counter medication without a healthcare provider’s advice if you are breastfeeding an infant.

Contraindications

To make sure that this medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare professional if you have:

  • a genetic enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency;
  • diabetes;
  • liver disease.

Alcoholalcohol

There may be a negative interaction between this OTC medication and alcohol.

Azo

It is the brand name of a medication called phenazopyridine, which belongs to a group of medications known as urinary analgesics.

This drug works by providing pain relief in the urinary tract.

Uses

This OTC medication is commonly used to relieve the pain associated with a urinary tract infection.

Important notes – do not use this over-the-counter medication for longer than 2 days unless your healthcare professional has told you to. In addition, this medicine will treat urinary symptoms, but it will not treat a urinary tract infection.

It will most likely darken the color of the urine to a red or orange color. However, don’t worry, this is a normal effect and is not harmful.

Dosage

The usual recommended dosage is 100 to 200 mg after meals 3 times a day.

Contraindications

To make sure that this over-the-counter medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have:

  • liver disease;
  • type 2 diabetes mellitus;
  • a genetic enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • headaches;
  • dizziness;
  • upset stomach.

Rare side effects may include:

  • pain in your lower back;
  • vomiting;
  • confusion;
  • little or no urinating;
  • loss of appetite;
  • a blue appearance of the skin;
  • fever (high temperature);
  • rapid weight gain;
  • stomach pain;
  • nausea.
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Contraindications

To make sure that this over-the-counter medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have:

  • liver disease;
  • type 2 diabetes mellitus;
  • a genetic enzyme deficiency called glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other drugs, especially:

  • Cymbalta (duloxetine);
  • gabapentin;
  • Zyrtec (cetirizine);
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine);
  • ibuprofen;
  • Lexapro (escitalopram);
  • metformin (type 2 diabetes medication);
  • Cipro (ciprofloxacin);
  • Synthroid (levothyroxine);
  • melatonin;
  • Lipitor (atorvastatin);
  • clonazepam;
  • cystex;
  • Xanax (alprazolam);
  • omeprazole;
  • hydrochlorothiazide;
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen).

Pregnancy & BreastfeedingGood For Pregnant Women

It is not known exactly whether this medication passes into breast milk or if it could negatively affect a nursing infant. Do not use this over-the-counter medication without a healthcare provider’s advice if you are breastfeeding an infant.

There are no well-done studies to determine the safety of this over-the-counter medication in pregnant women. Do not use this medication without a healthcare provider’s advice if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

Alcohol

There may be a negative interaction between this OTC medication and alcohol.

Bottom Line – Uricalm vs Azo

Uricalm (active ingredient – phenazopyridine) is a pain reliever medication which is used to treat urinary symptoms, like –  pain, increased urination, and increased urge to urinate.

Azo (active ingredient – phenazopyridine) is an over-the-counter medication which is used to treat urinary symptoms, like increased urination, pain, and increased urge to urinate.

In conclusion, both medications contain the same active ingredients. The differences lie in brand names and inactive ingredients.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4535106/
https://www.bmj.com/content/351/bmj.h6888
https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/ur

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