Mononessa vs Sprintec - What You Need to Know woman women

Mononessa

It is a combination of norgestimate and ethinyl estradiol, two hormones which belong to a group of medications called hormonal contraceptives.

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestimate prevent pregnancy by altering the cervical mucus and the lining of the uterus to prevent sperm from entering and by stopping ovulation.

Uses

This prescription birth control medication is typically used to prevent pregnancy.

Dosage

Take one pill a day, no more than 24 hours apart.

Smokingsmoking

Do not smoke tobacco while taking this prescription birth control medication, particularly if you are older than 35 years of age.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • vaginal itching or discharge;
  • darkening of facial skin;
  • breakthrough bleeding;
  • breast tenderness;
  • vomiting;
  • headaches;
  • acne;
  • nervousness;
  • changes in weight;
  • problems with contact lenses;
  • nausea;
  • skin rash.

Less common side effects may include:

  • sudden numbness or weakness;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • blurred vision;
  • sudden severe headache;
  • problems with vision or balance;
  • changes in the pattern of migraine headaches;
  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;
  • tiredness;
  • fever;
  • chest pain or pressure;
  • pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder;
  • upper stomach pain;
  • a breast lump;
  • pounding in your neck or ears;
  • pain in one or both legs;
  • slurred speech;
  • loss of appetite;
  • mood changes;
  • coughing up blood;
  • clay-colored stools;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • excessive sweating;
  • sleep problems;
  • dark urine;
  • stabbing chest pain.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • levothyroxine;
  • hydroxyzine;
  • librax;
  • Topamax (topiramate);
  • bupropion;
  • Zoloft (sertraline);
  • meloxicam;
  • ibuprofen;
  • Zyrtec (cetirizine);
  • clonazepam;
  • prednisone;
  • methocarbamol;
  • metformin;
  • sertraline;
  • Estarylla (ethinyl estradiol/norgestimate);
  • pantoprazole;
  • ondansetron;
  • trazodone;
  • lisinopril;
  • gabapentin.

Breastfeeding

Studies in breastfeeding women have concluded that there are negative effects on breastfed infants. Do not take this prescription birth control medication while breastfeeding an infant.

Contraindications

You should not take this prescription birth control medication if you have:

  • chest pain;
  • liver cancer;
  • circulation problems (especially if caused by type 2 diabetes mellitus);
  • a history of jaundice;
  • uncontrolled high blood pressure;
  • coronary artery disease;
  • a history of hormone-related cancer;
  • liver disease;
  • an increased risk of having blood clots;
  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;
  • severe migraine headaches;
  • if you take any hepatitis C medication;
  • unusual vaginal bleeding.

Sprintec

It is a combination of norgestimate and ethinyl estradiol, two hormones which belong to a group of medications called hormonal contraceptives.

Ethinyl estradiol and norgestimate prevent pregnancy by altering the cervical mucus and the lining of the uterus to prevent sperm from entering and by stopping ovulation.

Uses

This prescription birth control medication is used to prevent pregnancy.

Note – the use of this birth control pill, it will not protect from sexually transmitted diseases – including AIDS and HIV.

Dosage

Take one pill a day, no more than 24 hours apart.

Breastfeeding

Studies in breastfeeding women have concluded that there are negative effects on breastfed infants. Do not take this prescription birth control medication while breastfeeding an infant.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • breast tenderness;
  • changes in weight;
  • vaginal itching or discharge;
  • breakthrough bleeding;
  • darkening of facial skin;
  • headaches;
  • rash;
  • nausea;
  • nervousness;
  • problems with contact lenses;
  • vomiting;
  • acne.

Less common side effects may include:

  • problems with vision or balance;
  • chest pain or pressure;
  • a breast lump;
  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet;
  • sudden numbness or weakness;
  • mood changes;
  • pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder;
  • sweating;
  • changes in the pattern of migraine headaches;
  • loss of appetite;
  • sudden severe headache;
  • stabbing chest pain;
  • blurred vision;
  • clay-colored stools;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • slurred speech;
  • tired feeling;
  • weakness;
  • dark urine;
  • pounding in your ears;
  • fever (high temperature);
  • pain or warmth in one or both legs;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • coughing up blood;
  • upper stomach pain;
  • sudden vision loss;
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

Smoking

Do not smoke tobacco while taking this prescription birth control medication, particularly if you are older than 35 years of age.

Contraindications

You should not take this prescription birth control medication if you have:

  • chest pain;
  • if you take any hepatitis C medication;
  • coronary artery disease;
  • an increased risk of having blood clots;
  • untreated or uncontrolled high blood pressure;
  • liver disease;
  • a history of hormone-related cancer;
  • a history of jaundice;
  • unusual vaginal bleeding;
  • a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;
  • severe migraine headaches;
  • liver cancer;
  • circulation problems.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • gabapentin;
  • levothyroxine;
  • Mononessa (ethinyl estradiol/norgestimate);
  • bupropion;
  • trazodone;
  • metformin;
  • previfem;
  • Topamax (topiramate);
  • meloxicam;
  • Zyrtec (cetirizine);
  • clonazepam;
  • lisinopril;
  • methocarbamol;
  • Zoloft (sertraline);
  • pantoprazole;
  • ibuprofen;
  • ondansetron;
  • hydroxyzine;
  • sertraline;
  • prednisone.

Bottom Line – Mononessa vs Sprintec

Mononessa (ethinyl estradiol and norgestimate) is a birth control pill that prevents ovulation and causes changes in the cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus.

Sprintec (ethinyl estradiol and norgestimate) is a birth control pill that prevents ovulation and causes changes in the cervical mucus and uterine lining, making it harder for sperm to reach the uterus.

In conclusion, these birth control pills have the same active ingredients and concentration, but they contain some different inactive ingredients.

References

http://time.com/5106925/birth-control-pills-prevent-cancer/
http://www.businessinsider.com/a-new-study-says-this-birth