Fluocinonide vs Triamcinolone – Comparison of Side Effects & Uses

Fluocinonide

It is the generic name of a drug that belongs to a group of drugs called topical corticosteroids.

This medication works by suppressing the over-active immune system.

It was originally approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1971.

Uses

This prescription medication is typically used to relieve the redness, dryness, itching, discomfort, inflammation, scaling, and crusting of various skin conditions, like – psoriasis, eczema, and dermatitis.

Dosage

It comes in four forms: gel, ointment, cream, and liquid solution. Apply a thin film to the affected areas 2 to 4 times a day.

Note – do not apply this medication to a large area of skin. Apply only a small amount to the affected area and rub it gently into the skin. Do not use this corticosteroid on a child under age 12 without consulting with a healthcare provider.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • lightened color of treated skin;
  • increased hair growth;
  • headaches;
  • itching of treated skin;
  • sore throat;
  • skin dryness or irritation;
  • a stuffy nose;
  • folliculitis (redness or crusting around the hair follicles);
  • acne.

Rare side effects may include:

  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • seeing halos around lights;
  • signs of skin infection (redness, warmth, swelling, oozing);
  • puffiness in your face;
  • blurred vision;
  • severe skin irritation where the medication was applied;
  • tired feeling;
  • weight gain;
  • uneven heartbeats.

Contraindications

Before using this medication, tell your healthcare professional if you have, or have ever had:

  • circulation problems;
  • type 2 diabetes;
  • measles;
  • a skin infection;
  • chickenpox or shingles;
  • perioral dermatitis;
  • tuberculosis;
  • rosacea;
  • allergy to any type of medication;
  • intracranial hypertension;
  • a recent vaccination;
  • Cushing’s syndrome (an adrenal gland disorder);
  • glaucoma or cataracts;
  • an immune disorder.

Alcoholalcohol

There may be a negative interaction between this medication and alcohol.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • Cymbalta (duloxetine);
  • Advair Diskus (fluticasone/salmeterol);
  • Lipitor (atorvastatin);
  • Aspirin Low Strength (aspirin);
  • Nexium (esomeprazole);
  • absorica;
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine);
  • ProAir HFA (albuterol);
  • Lasix (furosemide);
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen);
  • Zyrtec (cetirizine);
  • Xanax (alprazolam);
  • Singulair (montelukast);
  • Norco (acetaminophen/hydrocodone);
  • MiraLax (polyethylene glycol 3350);
  • lotrimin;
  • Lyrica (pregabalin).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known exactly whether this medication passes into breast milk and negatively affects the infant. Tell your doctor that you are breastfeeding an infant before using this medicine.

It is also not known exactly whether this topical corticosteroid could negatively affect a developing fetus. Tell your doctor that you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using this medication.

Triamcinolone

It is the generic name of a drug that belongs to a group of drugs called corticosteroids.

This medication works by mimicking the action of steroids usually made by your body.

Uses

This medication is available in both prescription and over-the-counter form. It is typically used for disorders of the skin, kidney, lungs, blood, thyroid, eye, and intestines.

In addition, it is prescribed to treat inflammation caused by a variety of conditions, diseases, and allergies.

Dosage

Use exactly as prescribed by your healthcare professional. Do not use in smaller or larger amounts or for longer than recommended.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • slow wound healing;
  • mood changes;
  • spinning sensation;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • bloating;
  • thinning skin;
  • stomach pain;
  • skin discoloration;
  • nausea;
  • easy bruising;
  • changes in the shape or location of body fat;
  • dry skin;
  • muscle weakness;
  • acne;
  • dizziness;
  • headaches;
  • increased sweating.

Rare side effects may include:

  • seizure (convulsions);
  • problems with your vision;
  • coughing up blood;
  • fast heart rate;
  • shortness of breath;
  • severe pain in your upper stomach;
  • chest pain;
  • muscle weakness or limp feeling;
  • confusion;
  • bloody or tarry stools;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • increased urination;
  • rapid weight gain;
  • extreme thirst;
  • anxiety;
  • uneven heart rate;
  • unusual thoughts or behavior;
  • buzzing in your ears;
  • blurred vision;
  • severe depression;
  • a severe headache.

Contraindications

To make sure you can safely use this medication, tell your healthcare provider if you have any of these other conditions:

  • a thyroid disorder;
  • liver disease;
  • type 2 diabetes;
  • a history of malaria;
  • kidney disease;
  • osteoporosis;
  • tuberculosis;
  • herpes infection of the eyes;
  • glaucoma or cataracts;
  • myasthenia gravis;
  • high blood pressure;
  • diverticulitis;
  • congestive heart failure;
  • depression;
  • ulcerative colitis;
  • stomach ulcers.

Alcohol

There may be a negative interaction between this medication and alcohol.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept);
  • cancer medications;
  • other steroids, including – fluticasone (Advair), prednisone, or dexamethasone (Decadron);
  • etanercept (Enbrel);
  • cyclosporine (Neoral, Gengraf);
  • leflunomide (Arava);
  • tacrolimus (Prograf);
  • azathioprine (Imuran);
  • muromonab-CD3 (Orthoclone);
  • efalizumab (Raptiva);
  • basiliximab (Simulect);
  • sirolimus (Rapamune).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known exactly whether this medication passes into breast milk and negatively affects the infant. Tell your doctor that you are breastfeeding an infant before using this medicine.

It is also not known exactly whether this topical corticosteroid could negatively affect a developing fetus. Tell your doctor that you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before using this medication.

Bottom Line – Fluocinonide vs Triamcinolone

Fluocinonide is a topical steroid that is used to treat the inflammation caused by eczema, allergic reactions, and psoriasis. It works by preventing the release of substances in the body which cause inflammation.

Triamcinolone is a corticosteroid that is used to treat skin conditions, allergic disorders, ulcerative colitis, lupus, psoriasis, arthritis, or breathing disorders. It works by preventing the release of substances in the body which cause inflammation.

In conclusion, both medications are similarly effective in treating skin problems, however, they may not be suitable for people with specific medical conditions and may also cause some side effects. However, these side effects are relatively mild and infrequent.

Let your doctor decide which medication is best for you.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17178982
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8426717
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7929921