Brilinta vs Effient - Comparison of Uses & Side Effects

Brilinta

It is the brand name of a drug called ticagrelor, that belongs to a group of drugs called antiplatelet medications or platelet aggregation inhibitors.

The medication works by preventing platelets (components of blood whose function is to stop bleeding) from forming clots which could lead to strokes and heart attacks.

It is produced by AstraZeneca, an Anglo–Swedish multinational biopharmaceutical and pharmaceutical company. The US Food and Drug Administration originally approved this medication in 2011.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to lower the chance of having another stroke or heart attack in adults.

Dosage

For acute coronary syndrome, the usual initial recommended adult dose is 180 mg (two 90 mg tablets) taken two times per day. Maintenance dose is 90 mg per day.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • a cough;
  • mild dizziness;
  • diarrhea;
  • headaches;
  • nausea.

Rare side effects may include:

  • purple spots under the skin;
  • a nosebleed which will not stop;
  • red or pink urine:
  • a light-headed feeling;
  • weakness;
  • shortness of breath;
  • bloody or tarry stools;
  • unusual bleeding (mouth, nose, or rectum);
  • easy bruising;
  • chest pain or pressure;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • excessive sweating;
  • fever;
  • pain spreading to the jaw or shoulder;
  • problems with vision or balance;
  • pale skin;
  • slurred speech;
  • vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • sudden severe headache;
  • sudden numbness or weakness.

Before taking this platelet aggregation inhibitor, tell your healthcare provider if you have, or have ever had:

  • a stroke or mini-stroke;
  • a condition which causes you to bleed more easily;
  • allergies to any type of medicine;
  • a recent surgery or injury;
  • a lung disease, like – chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma;
  • any condition which can cause bleeding in the intestines;
  • liver disease;
  • bleeding in the stomach or head;
  • a stomach ulcer.

Alcohol

Avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while taking this platelet aggregation inhibitor since alcohol may raise the risk of developing bleeding in the intestines and stomach.

Drug Interactions

This platelet aggregation inhibitor may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • Decadron (dexamethasone);
  • certain antibiotics, like – PrevPac (lansoprazole, amoxicillin) or Biaxin (clarithromycin);
  • Lanoxin (digoxin);
  • antifungal medications, like – Nizoral (ketoconazole) or Onmel (itraconazole);
  • certain medications for seizures, like – Equetro (carbamazepine) or Tegretol;
  • Serzone (Nefazodone);
  • certain cholesterol-lowering medications, like – Altoprev (lovastatin) or Vytorin (ezetimibe);
  • St. John’s Wort;
  • medications for high blood pressure;
  • Rifamate (rifampin and isoniazid), Rifadin (rifampin), or Rifater (rifampin);
  • medications for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), like – Crixivan (indinavir), Reyataz (atazanavir), Invirase (saquinavir), or Kaletra (lopinavir).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known whether the platelet aggregation inhibitor passes into breast milk or could hurt a breastfeeding infant, therefore, if you want to use this medication, contact your doctor.

Moreover, there are no clinical studies to determine whether this platelet aggregation inhibitor can harm an unborn baby, hence, if you are pregnant, contact your doctor before using the medication.

Effient

It is the brand name of a drug called prasugrel, that belongs to a group of medications called antiplatelet agents or platelet aggregation inhibitors.

The medication works by preventing platelets from forming clots that can cause a heart attack or stroke.

It is produced by Eli Lilly and Company, a global pharmaceutical company with the headquarters in Indianapolis, USA. The US Food and Drug Administration originally approved this medication in 2009.

Uses

This prescription medication is typically used to lower the chance of stroke, heart attack,  or death in adults who have had a severe chest pain and have been treated with angioplasty.

Dosage

For acute coronary syndrome, the usual recommended dose is a single 60 mg oral loading dose and then continue at 10 mg orally once a day.

Note – sufferers should also take aspirin (75 mg to 325 mg) every day.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • easy bruising or bleeding;
  • nosebleeds.

Rare side effects may include:

  • pink or brown urine;
  • pale skin;
  • a light-headed feeling;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • any bleeding that will not stop;
  • sudden numbness or weakness;
  • purple spots under your skin;
  • problems with vision or balance;
  • fast heart rate;
  • slurred speech;
  • bloody or tarry stools;
  • fever;
  • coughing up vomit that looks like coffee grounds;
  • trouble breathing;
  • sudden severe headache;
  • stomach pain;
  • weakness.

To make sure that this antiplatelet agent is safe for you, tell your healthcare professional if you have:

  • stomach or intestinal bleeding;
  • a stomach ulcer;
  • if you weigh less than 132 pounds;
  • a history of injury, surgery, or medical emergency;
  • if you also use other medicines to treat or prevent blood clots;
  • kidney disease;
  • if you have ever had a severe allergic reaction to any type of medicine;
  • liver disease.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known precisely whether this antiplatelet agent passes into breast milk or could harm a breastfeeding infant. Therefore, do not use this medication while breastfeeding an infant without first talking to your healthcare provider.

This medication is a Pregnancy Category B drug, that means it is not expected to harm an unborn baby.

Alcohol

Limit your alcohol intake while taking this medication since regular use of alcohol while taking this antiplatelet agent may increase your risk of stomach bleeding.

Drug Interactions

This antiplatelet agent may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • Heparin;
  • cetirizine;
  • blood thinners, like – Coumadin (warfarin);
  • lexapro;
  • other medications to treat or prevent blood clots;
  • non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications, like – Aleve (naproxen) or Motrin (ibuprofen).

Bottom Line – Brilinta vs Effient

Brilinta (active ingredient – ticagrelor) is a medication that is used to lower the risk of having a stroke or serious heart problems after you have had severe chest pain or a heart attack.

It works by preventing platelets in the blood from sticking together and forming a blood clot.

Effient (active ingredient – prasugrel) is a medication used to prevent blood clots in individuals with the acute coronary syndrome who are undergoing a procedure after a recent stroke or heart attack as well as in people with certain disorders of the blood vessels or the heart.

It works by preventing platelets in the blood from sticking together and forming a blood clot.

According to a study done at the Cardiocenter of Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic, both drugs have similar effectiveness in the body.

References

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0904327
https://www.astrazeneca.com/media-centre/press-releases/2015/pn
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3353491/

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