Roxicodone vs Oxycodone - Uses, Side Effects, Differences

Roxicodone (Roxycodone)

It is the brand name of a drug called oxycodone which belongs to a class of drugs known as opiate analgesics. This drug works in the brain to change how the body responds and feels to pain. It is classified as a Schedule II controlled substance by the DEA.

Uses

It is used to help relieve moderate to severe pain. Also, it can be taken before surgery to sedate a patient. Furthermore, this medication might be used to treat other conditions.

Note – this drug is not meant to treat pain immediately after surgery unless you have been taking it before your surgery.

Dosage

It comes in a few forms including capsules, tablets, extended-release tablets, and oral solution. The usual recommended dose is 10 to 30 mg every 4 hours as required for pain. However, more severe pain may need 30 mg every 4 hours.

If you are taking the extended-release tablets, swallow them whole; do not break, chew,  crush, divide, or dissolve them.

Side Effects And Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • mild itching;
  • dry mouth;
  • stomach pain;
  • loss of appetite;
  • vomiting;
  • nausea;
  • constipation;
  • tired feeling;
  • dizziness;
  • headaches;
  • drowsiness.

Rare side effects may include:

  • low cortisol levels;
  • severe constipation;
  • convulsions;
  • unusual behavior;
  • confusion;
  • a light-headed feeling;
  • weak pulse;
  • shallow breathing.

To make sure this medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare specialist if you have ever had:

  • kidney disease;
  • liver disease;
  • problems with your pancreas, gallbladder, or thyroid;
  • urination problems;
  • mental illness;
  • seizures;
  • brain tumor;
  • a head injury.

Do not operate heavy machinery, drive a car, or participate in any other possibly dangerous activities until you know exactly how this medication affects you because it may make you drowsy.

People using this drug for longer than one month have increased chances to develop withdrawal symptoms if the drug is discontinued and tolerance. Symptoms include:

  • diarrhea;
  • vomiting;
  • tremors;
  • an abnormal sleep pattern;
  • overactive behaviors;
  • irritability.

Note – because the symptoms of withdrawal can be extremely unpleasant, in order to avoid experiencing them, many sufferers will resort back to the use of the drug.

In addition, some people who abuse this medication may be more prone to developing mental health disorders, like – anxiety disorders and depression. The risk of developing an addiction is higher for people who:

  • take the drug recreationally without a prescription;
  • take the drug in ways other than prescribed (for example like injecting it);
  • take the drug in higher quantities than prescribed;
  • take the drug more frequently than prescribed.

Oxycodone

It belongs to a class of medications called “opiates” and works in the brain to change how the human body feels and responds to pain.

In 1976, it was approved by the Food and Drug Administration and classified as a Schedule II drug by the Controlled Substances Act. This means that it:

  • may lead to serious physical or psychological dependence;
  • has a currently accepted medical use;
  • has a high potential for abuse.

Uses

This drug is used to help relieve moderate to severe pain, especially to treat pain caused by cancer and pain after a surgical operation. Also, it may be used for other types of long-term pain, particularly when weaker painkillers don’t work efficiently.

Dosage

It comes in a concentrated solution, solution, capsule, tablet, or extended-release tablets to take by mouth. The dose of this medication varies depending on the individual’s medical history, severity and cause of pain, body weight, and age.

The usual recommended dose of suppositories and tablets is 5 mg or 10 mg every 6 hours, as required for the pain.

Side Effects And Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • dry mouth;
  • loss of appetite;
  • mild itching;
  • dizziness;
  • vomiting;
  • nausea;
  • stomach pain;
  • constipation;
  • tired feeling;
  • headaches;
  • drowsiness.

Rare side effects may include:

  • convulsions;
  • slow heartbeats;
  • severe constipation;
  • shallow breathing;
  • missed menstrual periods;
  • worsening weakness;
  • loss of interest in sex;
  • severe drowsiness;
  • confusion;
  • sexual problems (erectile dysfunction);
  • a feeling like you might pass out.

To make sure this drug is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have:

  • urination problems;
  • brain tumor;
  • head injury;
  • a history of seizures;
  • kidney disease;
  • liver disease;
  • thyroid problems;
  • used a sedative like Valium (alprazolam, diazepam, Ativan, lorazepam, Restoril, Tranxene, Klonopin, Xanax, or Versed).
  • alcohol addiction;
  • problems with pancreas or gallbladder;
  • mental illness;
  • a history of drug abuse.

Important note – according to the data, approximately half of the people who take this type of medicine for at least 90 days are still taking them five years later. More importantly, prolonged use of this drug during pregnancy can lead to neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome. Also, withdrawal symptoms may occur in babies exposed to benzodiazepines, alcohol, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and barbiturates.

If this medication is abused, it can lead to addiction, which can be described as a greater tolerance to the dosage and dependence on the medication. Signs and symptoms of the abuse of this drug may include:

  • vomiting;
  • drowsiness;
  • constipation;
  • sedation;
  • low blood pressure;
  • euphoria;
  • sweating;
  • dry mouth;
  • lightheadedness;
  • headaches;
  • respiratory suppression;
  • nausea;
  • itching.

Roxicodone vs Oxycodone – Differences

Roxicodone is actually the brand name of oxycodone, a semi-synthetic, morphine-like opioid alkaloid which exerts its analgesic activity by binding to the mu-receptors in the central nervous system.

It is similar to codeine, morphine, and hydrocodone. Also, it does not eliminate the sensation of pain, however, it decreases discomfort by increasing the tolerance to pain.

In conclusion, both use the same chemical as its active ingredient, that means they have similar effects as well as the same long list of side effects.

3 Natural Pain Killers

#1 Cannabidiol Oil

It is found throughout the stalk, seeds, and flowers of cannabis plants, including marijuana and hemp. CBD is useful for treating pain, nausea, and anxiety. However, cannabidiol products aren’t approved by the FDA for any medical condition.

#2 Devil’s Claw

According to research, it can reduce pain in patients with osteoarthritis. This is due to its content of iridoid glycosides, plant compounds that have potent pain relieving properties.

#3 Kratom

It is used for severe pain, especially the type of pain which results from botched surgeries and car accidents. Kratom is a very capable painkiller, frequently replacing semi-synthetics opioids.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMHT0001326/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17449988
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2757528/
https://www.news-medical.net/?tag=/Oxycodone