Oxybutynin vs Vesicare – Comparison of Uses & Side Effects

Oxybutynin

It is the generic name of a drug that belongs to a group of drugs called antispasmodics. This drug can be found under the following brand names – Ditropan XL and Urotrol.

Mechanism of Action

This medication works by relaxing the bladder muscle.

It was first approved for use by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1978. It is produced by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a pharmaceutical company with the headquarters in Beerse, Belgium.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to treat overactive bladder, a condition where the bladder muscles contract uncontrollably and cause the urgent need to urinate frequently.

Dosage

The usual recommended dose is 5 mg 2 to 3 times per day.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • drowsiness;
  • dry mouth;
  • dizziness;
  • mild constipation;
  • blurred vision;
  • dry eyes.

Rare side effects may include:

  • little or no urinating;
  • hot and dry skin;
  • burning when you urinate;
  • seeing halos around lights;
  • heavy sweating;
  • eye pain;
  • being unable to urinate;
  • tunnel vision;
  • blurred vision;
  • constipation;
  • severe stomach pain;
  • feeling very thirsty.

Contraindications

Before taking this medication, tell your healthcare provider if you have:

  • if you are unable to urinate;
  • a blockage in your digestive tract;
  • uncontrolled narrow-angle glaucoma.

Alcohol

Avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while taking this medication since alcohol use can substantially increase the risk of side effects.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • Norco (acetaminophen/hydrocodone);
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine);
  • Alfentanil;
  • Paracetamol (acetaminophen);
  • donepezil;
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen);
  • hydrocodone;
  • oxycodone;
  • Metoprolol Succinate ER (metoprolol);
  • Myrbetriq (mirabegron);
  • Metoprolol Tartrate (metoprolol).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

If you are breastfeeding, you should avoid this medication since it negatively affects your baby.

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There have not been any adequate studies on pregnant humans. Tell your doctor that you are pregnant before taking this medication.

Vesicare

It is the brand name of a medication called solifenacin which is part of a class of medications called urinary antagonists.

This drug was first approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2004. It is manufactured and marketed by Astellas, GlaxoSmithKline and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries.

Mechanism of Action

It works by increasing the volume of urine which the bladder can hold and stops sudden bladder muscle contractions.

Precautions

To be sure that this medication is good for you, tell your healthcare professional:

  • if you have constipation;
  • if you suffer from severe kidney disease;
  • if you have trouble emptying your bladder;
  • if you have autonomic neuropathy;
  • if you have difficulty in passing urine;
  • if you have a heartburn or a stomach tear;
  • if you are at risk of your digestive system slowing down;
  • if you have liver disease;
  • if you have diabetes mellitus;
  • if you have glaucoma.

Uses

This medication is used to treat symptoms of an overactive bladder, like – incontinence and frequent or urgent urination.

Important notes – this medication may help to control the symptoms, however, it will not cure the condition. Also, it shouldn’t be prescribed for children younger than 18 years.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known whether this medication passes into breast milk, hence, it is best to avoid it if you are breast-feeding a baby. Additionally, there are no conclusive clinical studies about its safe use by pregnant women.

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Dosage

Note – it is commonly necessary to take this medication for at about one month before you can expect maximum benefits from this treatment.

The usual recommended dosage is 5 mg once a day. If the symptoms are still present, your doctor may increase the dose to 10 mg once a day.

Alcohol

Avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while taking this medication since alcohol use can substantially increase the risk of side effects.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • trazodone;
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine);
  • Paracetamol (acetaminophen);
  • hydrochlorothiazide;
  • oxybutynin;
  • Myrbetriq (mirabegron).

Side Effects And Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • dry eyes;
  • vomiting;
  • stomach pain;
  • dry mouth;
  • heartburn;
  • upset stomach;
  • blurred vision;
  • extreme tiredness;
  • constipation.

Less common side effects may include:

  • eye pain;
  • hallucinations;
  • constipation for 3 days or longer;
  • extreme thirst;
  • severe stomach pain;
  • confusion;
  • burning when you urinate;
  • dry skin;
  • vision changes;
  • seeing halos around lights;
  • urinating less than usual.

Bottom Line – Oxybutynin vs Vesicare

Oxybutynin (brand names – Ditropan XL and Urotrol) is a medication that is used to treat overactive bladder. It is in a class of medications called antimuscarinics or urinary antispasmodics.

Vesicare (active ingredient – solifenacin) is a medication that belongs to a group of drugs called anticholinergic medicines. It works by reducing the activity of the bladder and helps you control the bladder.

According to a 2007 study, both medications suppress premature detrusor contractions and allow enhanced bladder storage and relief of symptoms of an overactive bladder. Also, both appear to be equally effective in relieving the symptoms of an overactive bladder.

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Regarding their price, the average retail price for 60 tablets of oxybutynin 5mg is $23, while the average retail price for 30 tablets of Vesicare 10mg is $359.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2859137/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11322350
https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/label/2008/017577s034,0182

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