Geodon vs Latuda - Comparison of Side Effects & Uses schizophrenia

Geodon

It is the brand name of a drug called ziprasidone, that belongs to a group of drugs known as atypical antipsychotics.

This medication works by lessening the effects of certain chemicals in the brain involved with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

It is produced by Pfizer, Inc, a leading research-based biopharmaceutical companyThe US Food and Drug Administration originally approved this medication in 2001.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to treat symptoms of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.

Dosage

The usual recommended dose is 20 mg twice per day. The maximum recommended dose is 100 mg twice per day.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • tremors;
  • unusual tiredness;
  • feeling restless;
  • drowsiness;
  • rash;
  • dizziness;
  • worsening cough;
  • upset stomach;
  • a runny nose;
  • constipation;
  • diarrhea;
  • nausea.

Rare side effects may include:

  • blinking or eye movement;
  • a feeling like you might pass out;
  • pain when swallowing;
  • pounding heartbeats;
  • weight loss;
  • chest pain;
  • agitation;
  • uncontrolled muscle movements in your face;
  • confusion;
  • chills;
  • blurred vision;
  • dry skin;
  • red or swollen gums;
  • high fever;
  • mouth sores;
  • very stiff muscles;
  • a sore throat;
  • drowsiness;
  • sudden weakness;
  • fruity breath odor;
  • increased urination;
  • increased thirst.

Contraindications

You should not use this medication if you have:

  • untreated heart failure;
  • a heart rhythm disorder;
  • a personal history of Long QT syndrome;
  • if you have recently had a heart attack.

AlcoholAlcohol

Avoid consuming alcoholic beverages while taking this medication since alcohol use may increase the risk of severe side effects.

Drug InteractionsDrug

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • Droperidol (Inapsine);
  • Amiodarone (Pacerone);
  • Levomethadyl (ORLAAM);
  • Arsenic trioxide (Trisenox);
  • Mesoridazine;
  • Chlorpromazine;
  • concerta;
  • Pimozide (Orap);
  • Disopyramide (Norpace);
  • Probucol;
  • Dofetilide (Tikosyn);
  • Sotalol (Betapace, Sotylize);
  • Dolasetron (Anzemet);
  • Tacrolimus (Prograf);
  • Gatifloxacin;
  • Thioridazine;
  • Halofantrine (Halfan);
  • Sparfloxacin;
  • Mefloquine (Lariam);
  • Quinidine (Nuedexta);
  • Moxifloxacin (Avelox);
  • Procainamide;
  • Pentamidine (NebuPent).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known exactly whether this prescription medication passes into breast milk or if it could negatively affect a breastfed infant. Tell your doctor that you are breastfeeding before using this medication.

It is not known exactly whether this medication will harm a developing fetus. Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to fall pregnant before taking this medication.

Latuda

It is the brand name of a medication called lurasidone, which belongs to a group of medications called atypical antipsychotics.

This medication works by decreasing the effects of some chemicals in the brain.

It is manufactured by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals, a pharmaceutical company. It was originally approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2010.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to treat episodes of depression in individuals with manic depression (bipolar disorder). Furthermore, it is used to treat schizophrenia in adults and adolescents who are at least 13 years old.

Dosage

For the treatment of schizophrenia, the usual recommended dosage is 40 mg once a day.

For the treatment of depression associated with bipolar disorder (manic depression), the usual recommended dosage is 20 mg once a day. The dose may be increased depending on how the sufferers respond to the treatment.

Important note – if the sufferer has liver or kidney impairment, the healthcare provider may adjust the dose appropriately, until the desired effect is achieved.

Contraindications

To make sure that this medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had:

  • a stroke;
  • kidney disease;
  • occasional low white blood cell counts;
  • liver disease;
  • high triglycerides (a type of fat in the blood);
  • breast cancer;
  • high LDL and total cholesterol;
  • high blood pressure;
  • diabetes;
  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • suicidal thoughts and/or actions;
  • heart disease.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • gabapentin;
  • Abilify (aripiprazole);
  • hydroxyzine;
  • Adderall (amphetamine/dextroamphetamine);
  • lamotrigine;
  • Ambien (zolpidem);
  • Lexapro (escitalopram);
  • Benadryl (diphenhydramine);
  • lithium;
  • tasigna;
  • clonazepam;
  • omeprazole;
  • Cymbalta (duloxetine);
  • Prozac (fluoxetine);
  • Depakote (divalproex sodium);
  • Seroquel (quetiapine);
  • ibuprofen;
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen);
  • Klonopin (clonazepam);
  • Wellbutrin (bupropion);
  • levothyroxine;
  • Zoloft (sertraline);
  • lisinopril;
  • Xanax (alprazolam);
  • metformin;
  • trazodone;
  • Topamax (topiramate);
  • phentermine.

Side Effects And Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • restlessness;
  • muscle rigidity;
  • decreased sexual ability;
  • nausea;
  • drowsiness;
  • agitation;
  • slow movements;
  • dizziness;
  • weight gain.

Less common side effects may include:

  • extreme thirst or hunger;
  • seizures (convulsions);
  • thoughts of hurting yourself;
  • fast heartbeats;
  • agitation;
  • increased urination;
  • mouth puckering;
  • fainting;
  • weight loss;
  • trouble swallowing;
  • body aches;
  • blurred vision;
  • sores in your mouth and throat;
  • uncontrollable movements of the face, arms, eyes, tongue, lips, or legs;
  • confusion;
  • dry skin;
  • feeling like you might pass out;
  • hostility;
  • very stiff (rigid) muscles;
  • muscle discomfort.

Pregnancy & BreastfeedingPregnancy

It is not known exactly whether this medication will harm a developing fetus. Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or plan to fall pregnant before taking this medication.

It is not known exactly whether this prescription medication passes into breast milk or if it could negatively affect a breastfed infant. Tell your doctor that you are breastfeeding before using this medication.

Alcohol

Avoid consuming alcoholic beverages while taking this medication since alcohol use may increase the risk of severe side effects.

Bottom Line – Geodon vs Latuda

Geodon (active ingredient – ziprasidone) is an antipsychotic medication that is used to treat schizophrenia and the manic symptoms of bipolar disorder (manic depression). This medication works by changing the effects of chemicals in the brain.

Latuda (active ingredient – lurasidone) is an antipsychotic drug which helps to correct chemical imbalances in the brain. It is used to treat schizophrenia and the manic symptoms of bipolar disorder.

According to a meta-analysis that was published on March 7, 2017, lurasidone was found to be more efficacious than ziprasidone. In addition, lurasidone was associated with less somnolence than ziprasidone.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18312045
https://annals-general-psychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1744-859X-12-1
https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/neuroscience/ziprasidone