Genvoya vs Atripla – Uses, Dosage, Side Effects, Differences

Genvoya

It is the brand name of a medication which contains elvitegravir, cobicistat, tenofovir, and emtricitabine. Cobicistat works by reducing the action of enzymes in the liver which breaks down certain antiviral drugs.

Cobicistat also helps increase the levels of elvitegravir. Emtricitabine, elvitegravir, and tenofovir are antiviral drugs which prevent human immunodeficiency virus from multiplying in the body. Together, these drugs are antiretroviral medications.

Uses

This medication is typically used to treat human immunodeficiency virus. It works by decreasing the amount of HIV in the human body, hence, the immune system can work more efficiently.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus which attacks the immune system. AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) is a life-threatening condition caused by HIV. Signs and symptoms of early human immunodeficiency virus infection may include:

  • joint pain;
  • fever;
  • a sore throat;
  • chills;
  • unintentional weight loss;
  • weakness;
  • tiredness;
  • a red rash;
  • enlarged glands;
  • sweats;
  • muscle aches.

Note – this drug can’t cure HIV/AIDS, however, taking it on a regular basis helps people with HIV live longer.

Dosage

The usual recommended dose is 1 tablet taken orally once per day with food in pediatric patients with body weight at least 25 kilograms and adults.

Side Effects And Precautions

Common side effects may include:

Rare side effects may include:

  • rash;
  • abdominal pain;
  • light-colored bowel movements;
  • vomiting;
  • pain in the right side of the stomach;
  • loss of appetite;
  • dark-colored urine;
  • yellowing of your skin or the whites of the eyes;
  • flatulence;
  • indigestion.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor:

  • if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed;
  • if you are allergic to any other medicines;
  • if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant;
  • if you have any other medical conditions;
  • if you have kidney problems;
  • if you have liver problems, such as – hepatitis B virus infection;
  • about other OTC and prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, vitamins, and herbal products you plan to take or are taking;
  • if you are using hormone-based birth control, like – implants, pills, or vaginal rings.
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Some drugs can interact with this HIV medication and should not be used at the same time. These drugs may include – rifampin, alfuzosin, simvastatin, lovastatin, triazolam, oral midazolam, St. John’s wort, sildenafil, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, phenytoin, methylergonovine, dihydroergotamine, pimozide, or lurasidone.

Atripla

It is the brand name of a drug that contains a combination of emtricitabine, efavirenz, and tenofovir. These drugs belong to the class of drugs called antiretrovirals and are used to treat human immunodeficiency virus infection.

This medication is the first “one-pill-daily” regimen licensed for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection in people older than 18 years.

Atripla was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2006. It is produced by Bristol Myers Squibb & Gilead Sciences, LLC.

Uses

This medication is used to treat human immunodeficiency virus, the virus which can cause AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome). It can be used by adults and children 12 years of age and older who weigh at least 40 kg.

Notes – it is not approved for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection, an infection of the liver which can cause liver failure and cancer. Also, it is not a cure for HIV or AIDS.

Dosage

It comes as a tablet to take by mouth and is typically taken once per day.

Side Effects And Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • diarrhea;
  • dizziness;
  • nausea;
  • tired feeling;
  • drowsiness;
  • trouble concentrating;
  • strange dreams;
  • changes in the shape or location of body fat;
  • depressed mood;
  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • headaches;
  • rash.

Rare side effects may include:

  • seizures (convulsions);
  • thoughts of hurting yourself;
  • severe depression;
  • upper stomach pain;
  • a sore throat;
  • increased thirst and urination;
  • hallucinations;
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes;
  • muscle pain or weakness;
  • a red or purple skin rash which spreads;
  • clay-colored stools;
  • burning in the eyes;
  • swelling of the face or tongue.
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This medication may also increase the risk of certain autoimmune disorders or infections by negatively affecting the immune system. Signs and symptoms may occur months after the treatment is started. Tell your healthcare provider if you experience:

  • chest pain, particularly when you breathe;
  • rapid heart rate;
  • unexplained weight loss;
  • fever;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • cold sores;
  • wheezing;
  • night sweats;
  • a dry cough;
  • stomach pain;
  • weakness or prickly feeling;
  • diarrhea;
  • loss of bowel or bladder control;
  • sores on the anal or genital area;
  • mouth sores;
  • swollen glands;
  • severe lower back pain;
  • trouble speaking or swallowing;
  • menstrual changes;
  • feeling anxious or irritable;
  • loss of interest in sex;
  • swelling of the neck or throat;
  • problems with balance or eye movement.

To be sure that this medication is good for you, tell your doctor:

  • if you have bone problems;
  • If you are using drugs or alcohol;
  • if you are allergic to any other drugs;
  • if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed;
  • if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant;
  • if you have or have ever had a mental illness;
  • if you have kidney problems or are undergoing kidney dialysis treatment;
  • if you have liver problems, like – hepatitis B virus infection;
  • if you are using hormone-based birth control, like – implants, pills, or vaginal rings;
  • if you have any other medical conditions;
  • if you are taking medicine for seizures.

Furthermore, tell your doctor about other vitamins, nonprescription and prescription drugs,  nutritional supplements, and herbal products you plan to take or are taking.

Genvoya vs Atripla – Differences

Genvoya (active ingredients – elvitegravir, cobicistat, tenofovir, and emtricitabine) is a combination medicine that belongs to a group of drugs called HIV integrase strand transfer inhibitor. It is typically used to treat human immunodeficiency virus infection in adults and children who weigh at least 25 kilograms. This medication works by increasing the number of T cells, allowing the immune system to improve. Also, it blocks a chemical in the human body which is required for HIV-1 to multiply.

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Atripla (active ingredients – efavirenz, emtricitabine, and tenofovir) is used to treat people with HIV infection. It works by interfering with enzymes which are required for human immunodeficiency virus to multiply.

Ways To Boost Your Immune System Naturally

#1 Ginseng

The stems, roots, and leaves of ginseng have been used for enhancing resistance to illness or infection and maintaining immune homeostasis.

#2 Nutrition

A regular diet rich in vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, and seeds will provide your body with the essential nutrients your immune system requires.

#3 Vitamin D

If you want a healthy and efficient immune system, you need to make sure you are getting enough vitamin D.

#4 Astragalus Root

This plant has a very long history as a disease fighter and immune system booster.

#5 Sleep

Sleep deprivation increases the hormone cortisol, and a prolonged elevation of cortisol is linked with a suppressed immune function.

References

https://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-144753/atripla-oral/details
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3218697/
https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/drugsatfda_docs/nda/2015/207561Orig1s000SumR.pdf
https://www.genvoya.com/hcp/clinical-efficacy-trials/treatment-naive-adults/stud

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