Brovana vs Perforomist - Comparison of Benefits & Side Effects

Brovana

It is the brand name of a drug called arformoterol that belongs to a group of medications called long-acting beta agonists. It works by relaxing and opening air passages in the lungs, making it substantially easier for you to breathe.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to control shortness of breath, wheezing, coughing, and chest tightness caused by COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Note – it will not treat a bronchospasm attack which has already begun.

Dosage

It comes as a solution to inhale by mouth using a machine which turns medication into a mist which can be inhaled. For chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the usual recommended dose for an adult is 15 mcg inhaled by nebulization two times per day.

The maximum recommended dose is 30 mcg per day.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • trouble breathing;
  • diarrhea;
  • chest pain;
  • leg cramps;
  • back pain;
  • swelling of the hands or feet;
  • skin rash;
  • flu symptoms;
  • stuffy nose.

Rare side effects may include;

  • worsening breathing problems;
  • choking;
  • fast or pounding heartbeats;
  • breathing problems;
  • chest pain;
  • wheezing;
  • severe headaches;
  • fruity breath odor;
  • nosebleed;
  • increased thirst;
  • blurred vision;
  • anxiety;
  • dry mouth;
  • pounding in your neck or ears;
  • increased urination;
  • pain in the ovaries;
  • leg cramps;
  • blurred vision;
  • high blood pressure;
  • irregular heartbeats;
  • muscle weakness or limp feeling;
  • numbness or tingling;
  • fluttering in your chest;
  • constipation.

To make sure that this medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had:

  • a seizure;
  • heart disease;
  • liver disease;
  • type 2 diabetes mellitus;
  • a thyroid disorder;
  • a certain metabolic problem (ketoacidosis);
  • allergy to any type of medication;
  • overactive thyroid (hyperthyroidism).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is not known if the medication passes into human milk. Therefore, you and your healthcare provider will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using the medication.

There are no well-controlled clinical studies conducted in humans, hence, contact your doctor before using this medication if you are pregnant or plant to fall pregnant.

Drug Interactions

This medication may negatively interact with other drugs, especially:

  • acetazolamide (Diamox);
  • theophylline (Theocron, Theolair);
  • chlorothiazide (Diuril);
  • amiloride (Midamor);
  • furosemide (Lasix);
  • bumetanide (Bumex);
  • amlodipine;
  • triamterene (Dyrenium, Dyazide, Maxzide);
  • chlorthalidone (Thalitone);
  • prednisone (Deltasone, Orasone, Sterapred);
  • ethacrynic acid (Edecrin);
  • torsemide (Demadex);
  • qvar;
  • hydrocortisone (Cortef, Hydrocortone);
  • hydrochlorothiazide (Microzide, HCTZ);
  • fludrocortisone (Florinef);
  • metolazone (Zaroxolyn);
  • tricyclic antidepressants like – amitriptyline (Elavil), trimipramine (Surmontil); clomipramine (Anafranil), or protriptyline (Vivactil);
  • carvedilol (Coreg);
  • budesonide (Entocort);
  • bisoprolol (Zebeta);
  • methylprednisolone (Medrol, Solu-Medrol);
  • nebivolol (Bystolic);
  • fluticasone (Flovent);
  • betaxolol (Kerlone);
  • mometasone (Asmanex, Dulera);
  • propranolol (Inderal);
  • ciclesonide (Alvesco);
  • isocarboxazid (Marplan);
  • flunisolide (AeroBid, Aerospan);
  • tranylcypromine (Parnate);
  • triamcinolone (Kenacort, Aristocort);
  • phenelzine (Nardil);
  • dexamethasone (Decadron);
  • rasagiline (Azilect);
  • selegiline (Emsam, Eldepryl, Zelapar);
  • metoprolol (Toprol XL, Lopressor).

Perforomist      

It is the brand name of a drug called formoterol, that belongs to a group of drugs called adrenergic bronchodilators or long-acting beta agonists. This medication works by helping the muscles in the lungs to stay relaxed. This opens up the airways and makes it easier for you to breathe.

Uses

This prescription medication is typically used to treat COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease).

Dosage

To prevent exercise-induced asthma, use the long-acting beta agonist 15 minutes before starting your exercise session and allow 12 hours to pass before using it again.

Note – it is not a rescue medicine, therefore, it will not work fast enough to treat a bronchospasm or asthma attack.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • sleep problems (insomnia);
  • tremors;
  • diarrhea;
  • nervousness;
  • vomiting;
  • dizziness;
  • headaches;
  • muscle cramps;
  • nausea.

Rare side effects may include;

  • trouble sleeping;
  • wheezing;
  • nervousness;
  • pounding heartbeats;
  • worsening breathing problems;
  • fluttering in your chest;
  • increased thirst or urination;
  • chest pain;
  • constipation;
  • unexplained weight loss;
  • muscle weakness or limp feeling;
  • numbness or tingling;
  • leg cramps;
  • blurred vision;
  • dry skin;
  • drowsiness;
  • fruity breath odor;
  • dry mouth.

To make sure that this long-acting beta agonist is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had:

  • high blood pressure;
  • a food or drug allergy;
  • heart disease;
  • diabetes;
  • epilepsy or other seizure disorder;
  • an aneurysm (swelling of an artery);
  • pheochromocytoma (tumor of the adrenal gland);
  • a thyroid disorder.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

There are no well-done studies to determine the effects on an infant when using this long-acting beta agonist during breastfeeding. Therefore, talk with your healthcare professional before using the medication if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Also, there are no clinical studies in pregnant women. Contact your healthcare professional if you want to use this long-acting beta agonist during pregnancy.

Drug Interactions

This long-acting beta agonist may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • an MAO inhibitor, such as – linezolid, isocarboxazid, rasagiline, phenelzine, or tranylcypromine;
  • a beta-blocker, such as – carvedilol, atenolol, propranolol, metoprolol, and others;
  • a diuretic or “water pill”;
  • theophylline.

Bottom Line – Brovana vs Perforomist

Brovana (active ingredient – arformoterol) is a bronchodilator that works by relaxing muscles in the airways to improve breathing. It is used to prevent bronchoconstriction in people with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including emphysema and chronic bronchitis.

Note – it doesn’t work fast enough to relieve sudden breathing problems.

Perforomist (active ingredient – formoterol) is a long-acting bronchodilator that relaxes muscles in the airways to improve breathing. It is used to prevent bronchospasm in adults with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema.

Note – do not use it to treat sudden asthma or bronchospasm attack since it will not work fast enough.

References
TM-Inhalation-Solution-Study-Data-Presented
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4251615/
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0954611108004617

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