Bactrim vs Cipro For UTI – Differences & Side Effects women woman hair skin

Bactrim

It is the brand name of a combination of sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, two drugs that belong to a group of drugs called antibiotics.

Mechanism of Action

This medication works by stopping bacterial growth.

It is manufactured by Mutual Pharmaceutical Co., a subsidiary of Pharmaceutical Holdings Corporation. The US Food and Drug Administration originally approved this medication in 1973.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to treat bacterial infections of the intestines, urinary tract, and ears. In addition, this antibiotic treats pneumonia caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii and infections which cause traveler’s diarrhea.

Dosage

For the treatment of urinary tract infections, the usual recommended dosage is 1 or 2 tablets every 12 hours for 10 to 14 days.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • mild itching or rash;
  • loss of appetite;
  • vomiting;
  • nausea.

Rare side effects may include:

  • worsening cough;
  • diarrhea which is watery or bloody;
  • sore throat;
  • swollen gums;
  • trouble concentrating;
  • feeling unsteady;
  • rapid heart rate;
  • fever;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • pale skin;
  • burning in your eyes;
  • sudden weakness;
  • skin pain;
  • skin sores;
  • swelling in your face or tongue;
  • pain when swallowing;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • painful mouth sores;
  • clay-colored stools;
  • loss of coordination;
  • upper stomach pain;
  • severe weakness;
  • slurred speech.

Contraindications

Before taking this medication, tell your healthcare provider if you have:

  • HIV or AIDS;
  • kidney or liver disease;
  • folate deficiency;
  • porphyria (a genetic enzyme disorder which causes symptoms affecting the nervous system or skin);
  • severe allergies;
  • if you are malnourished;
  • asthma;
  • a glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency;
  • a thyroid disorder.

Alcoholalcohol

Avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while taking this medication since alcohol use can substantially increase the risk of severe side effects.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • Diflucan (fluconazole);
  • albuterol;
  • gabapentin;
  • amlodipine;
  • Lasix (furosemide);
  • aspirin;
  • Lipitor (atorvastatin);
  • Control (phenylpropanolamine);
  • methadone;
  • temazepam;
  • Coumadin (warfarin);
  • omeprazole;
  • doxycycline;
  • warfarin;
  • furosemide;
  • Tylenol (acetaminophen);
  • Keflex (cephalexin);
  • tramadol;
  • levothyroxine.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Do not breastfeed a baby when taking this antibiotic since it is excreted in breast milk and has the potential to harm the breastfed baby.

Do not use this antibiotic if you are pregnant because it can cause urinary tract defects or club feet to the unborn baby.

Cipro

It is the brand name of a drug called ciprofloxacin, that belongs to a group of antibiotics called fluoroquinolones.

The US Food and Drug Administration originally approved this fluoroquinolone in 1987.

Mechanism of Action

It works by killing the bacteria that cause infections.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to treat a variety of bacterial infections, including pneumonia, urinary tract infections, and sinus infections.

Note – avoid exposure to sunlight or tanning beds since this fluoroquinolone can make you sunburn more easily.

Contraindications

To make sure that this medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had:

  • a head injury or brain tumor;
  • a muscle or nerve disorder, such as myasthenia gravis;
  • long QT syndrome (affecting you or a family member);
  • arthritis or other joint problems (especially in children);
  • heart problems;
  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia);
  • kidney disease.

Dosage

The dose of this fluoroquinolone will be different for different sufferers. Follow your healthcare provider’s orders or the directions on the label.

Alcohol

Avoid drinking alcoholic beverages while taking this medication since alcohol use can substantially increase the risk of severe side effects.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • stomach pain;
  • abnormal liver function tests;
  • nausea;
  • headaches;
  • vomiting;
  • diarrhea;
  • vaginal itching or discharge.

Less common side effects may include:

  • breathing problems;
  • feeling restless or nervous;
  • fluttering in your chest;
  • diarrhea that is watery or bloody;
  • muscle weakness;
  • sudden dizziness (like you might pass out);
  • little or no urination;
  • severe stomach pain;
  • thoughts about hurting yourself;
  • trouble sleeping;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • fast or pounding heartbeats;
  • increased hunger;
  • anxiety;
  • ringing in your ears;
  • shortness of breath;
  • pain behind your eyes;
  • tremors;
  • feeling anxious or shaky;
  • confusion;
  • nightmares;
  • paranoia;
  • depression;
  • hallucinations.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • metoclopramide (Reglan, Reglan ODT);
  • products that contain caffeine;
  • glyburide (Micronase, Glynase);
  • a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug;
  • clozapine (Clozaril);
  • a water pill (diuretic);
  • omeprazole (Prilosec);
  • a blood thinner, like – warfarin, Jantoven;
  • cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sangcya);
  • a tricyclic antidepressant;
  • a steroid medicine;
  • Coreg (carvedilol);
  • pentoxifylline (Trental);
  • tizanidine (Zanaflex);
  • probenecid (Probalan);
  • methotrexate (Trexall);
  • lidocaine (Xylocaine intravenous infusion);
  • theophylline, like – Theo-24, Theochron, Theolair;
  • sildenafil (Viagra);
  • ropinirole (Requip);
  • an antipsychotic medicine;
  • keppra;
  • a medicine to control your heart rate or rhythm;
  • phenytoin (Cerebyx, Phenytek).

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

It is unknown whether this medication is safe to take during pregnancy. Therefore, before taking this fluoroquinolone, women should let their healthcare provider know if they are pregnant.

What doctors do know is the fact that this fluoroquinolone passes into breast milk, therefore, it is not safe to take if you are breastfeeding.

Bottom Line – Bactrim vs Cipro              

Bactrim (active ingredients – sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim) is a medication that belongs to a group of drugs called antibiotics. It is used to treat bacterial infections in different parts of the human body. This antibiotic works by stopping the growth of the bacteria causing the infection.

Cipro (active ingredient – ciprofloxacin) is an antibiotic which fights pathogenic bacteria in the body. It is used to treat different types of bacterial infections.

According to a 2002 study, efficacy and safety outcomes were similar in people treated with these antibiotics.

Regarding their price, the average retail price for 100 tablets of Bactrim 400mg/80mg is $155, while the average retail price for 100 tablets of Cipro 500mg is $605.

References

https://www.jwatch.org/jw200201150000003/2002/01/15/cipro-vs-tmp-smx-elderly-women-with-utis
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5166873
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5287938

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