3 Famous People With Waardenburg Syndrome (Mila Kunis?)

Waardenburg syndrome is a genetic disorder which causes white forelock (a frontal white blaze of hair), deafness, wide-set inner corners of the eyes, and a difference of color between the iris of one eye and the other, white eyelashes.

Additional physical traits, like – low frontal hairline, a wide space between the eyes (called a broad nasal root), and eyebrows which connect, may also occur in some individuals with the syndrome.

This disorder is named after a Dutch ophthalmologist called Petrus Johannes Waardenburg, who noticed that heterochromia iridis frequently accompanied deafness.

According to statistics, WS affects 1 out of 42,000 births, with 2-62 percent of them presenting deafness.

Types

There are at least 4 different types of WS, including:

  • WS type 1 is distinguished by the presence of dystopia canthorum;
  • WS type 2 is distinguished from type 1 by the absence of dystopia canthorum;
  • WS type 3 has dystopia canthorum and upper limb abnormalities;
  • WS type 4 has the additional feature of Hirschsprung disease.

Causes

Mutation in the PAX gene is the main cause of this syndrome.

This mutation causes impaired activity of the neural crest, that is supposedly responsible for the craniofacial bone and cartilage, melanocytes, and smooth muscles.

Some cases of WS type II and type IV appear to have an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, that means both copies of the gene in each cell have mutations.

Risk Factors

The syndrome is hereditary. It can be passed to you from one or both of your parents.

Individuals with WS have a 50% chance of passing the gene to their children.

Moreover, occasionally, the mutation causing WS occurs spontaneously.

Signs

Individuals with WS often have the following characteristics:

  • eyebrows which touch in the middle;
  • wide-set eyes due to a prominent, broad nasal root;
  • a low hairline;
  • distinctive hair coloring, like – a patch of white hair or hair which prematurely turns gray;
  • one eye has sections of two different colors;
  • two different colored eyes (complete heterochromia);
  • very pale blue eyes.
SEE ALSO:  Ribose vs Deoxyribose – Structure, Functions, Differences

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine:

“People with this condition often have very pale blue eyes or different colored eyes, such as one blue eye and one brown eye. Sometimes one eye has segments of two different colors.” 

Complications

People with WS have a higher than average association with:

  • patches of white pigmentation on the skin similar to vitiligo;
  • cleft lip and palate, scapular elevation;
  • spinal and intestinal defects.

Usually, individuals affected with WS tend to have a normal hearing, however, some may experience hearing loss, either bilaterally or unilaterally.

Diagnosis

In order to diagnose WS, the treating doctor may order the following tests:

  • genetic testing;
  • colon biopsy;
  • bowel transit time;
  • audiometry testing to look for hearing loss.

Treatment

There is no direct treatment for WS itself, but genetic counseling may be beneficial for affected parents who want to start a family.

Also, hearing aids or cochlear implants may be needed for people with this syndrome who start to experience hearing loss.

Here Are 3 Famous People With Waardenburg syndrome:

#1 Stef Sanjatir

Stef was a student at Complections College of Makeup Art and Design. Stef started uploading content to YouTube in January 2015.

Currently, her YouTube channel has more than half a million subscribers.

Sanjati has worked with the collaborative YouTube channel PerfectAndrogyny.

As a child, she was diagnosed with this syndrome that has caused her to be deaf in her left ear.

Also, due to this genetic condition, Stef has very blue eyes that appear further apart than on an average person, bone mutations on her face, and pigmentation of skin and hair.

Interestingly, on Friday, December 16, 2016, Stef underwent Facial Feminisation Surgery (a cosmetic surgical procedure which alters male facial features to bring them closer to female facial features) in Boston, Massachusetts with Dr. Jeffrey Spiegel.

#2 Paris Jackson

pp
Image credit – https://www.flickr.com/photos/paris-jackson/32464092385

She is an American actress and model that was born on April 3, 1998, in Beverly Hills, California.

Paris is the second child and only daughter of the pop legend Michael Jackson.

Jackson has two brothers, Prince and Blanket Jackson.

In 2010, Paris accepted his father posthumous Lifetime Achievement Award at the Grammy Awards. 

According to some sources, her cold, almost transparent blue eyes are caused by the Waardenburg syndrome. However, the syndrome does not affect her vision and hearing.

#3 Ketlen Silva de Jesus

Even if she is not currently famous, Ketlen Silva de Jesus is a little girl that was scouted by João Pedro Sampaio, a Brazilian photographer, who believes that she will make her mark as a fashion model.

Her blue eyes are also caused by WS.gNotes

Cydnee Black is a freelance makeup artist who publishes hair and makeup tutorials on her self-titled channel.

She believes that she has WS since she has very pale blue eyes and is completely deaf in one ear.

Abushe

Abushe lives in southern Ethiopia. He was born with WS.

In October 2016, a Cape Town-based blogger – Mike, meet Abushe.

Abushe is 8, he lives in south Ethiopia, i met him in front of a bank. His blue eyes were just incredible. I came back…

Posted by Eric Lafforgue on Monday, March 21, 2016

Describing the moment, the blogger wrote:

 “He had blue eyes like I’ve never seen before in my life! They were like two tiny planets, with the friendliest face to go with them.”

Mila Kunis

There are some rumors that American actress Mila Kunis has Waardenburg syndrome, however, she had suffered from a different condition, called chronic inflammation of the iris.

Image credit – https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mila_Kunis

In an interview, she said:

”I was blind in one eye for many years, and nobody knew.”

However, surgery has corrected the problem.

Do you know any other celebrities with Waardenburg syndrome? Please let us know in the comments below.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26405672
https://projects.ncsu.edu/cals/course/gn301/BP_on_Waardenburg_Syndrome.pdf
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4575665/
 

Sharing is caring!

Leave a Comment