Orabase vs Orajel – Which Is Better For Canker Sores & Toothache mouth teeth tooth

Orabase

It is the brand name of a medication called benzocaine, a local anesthetic medication which works by blocking nerve signals in the human body.

In addition, this medication causes a temporary loss of sensory perception, especially of pain in a restricted area of the body.

Uses

It is typically used to:

  • numb the skin or surfaces inside the throat, vagina, mouth, nose, or rectum to lessen the pain of inserting a medical instrument;
  • reduce pain caused by minor skin irritations, sunburn, teething pain, sore throat,  vaginal or rectal irritation, hemorrhoids, or ingrown toenails.

Dosage

Use exactly as prescribed by your healthcare professional, or as directed on the label. Do not use for longer than recommended or in smaller or larger amounts.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • mild stinging where this local anesthetic medication was applied;
  • dry white flakes where this local anesthetic medication was applied;
  • skin redness or tenderness.

Less common side effects may include:

  • severe sensitivity where the medication was applied;
  • blistering or any signs of infection;
  • a blue appearance of the lips, skin, or fingernails;
  • confusion;
  • warmth, redness, or swelling where the medication was applied;
  • headaches;
  • feeling short of breath;
  • tired feeling;
  • fast heart rate.

Contraindications

To be sure that this local anesthetic medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare professional if you have:

  • high LDL cholesterol levels;
  • a history of allergy to local anesthetics, including –  procaine, butacaine, or other “caine” anesthetics;
  • if you smoke tobacco;
  • respiratory disorders, including – bronchial asthma, bronchitis, or emphysema;
  • kidney disease;
  • open wounds or damaged areas in the lining of the mouth;
  • metabolic impairments, including – thyrotoxicosis or diabetes mellitus;
  • a personal history of methemoglobinemia;
  • cardiovascular diseases, including – myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, uncontrolled hypertension, or cardiac arrhythmias;
  • renal impairments.

Drug Interactionsdrugs pills

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • trazodone;
  • itraconazole;
  • aviane;
  • terconazole;
  • other anesthetics, like – mexiletine;
  • beta-blockers;
  • codeine phosphate;
  • diphenhydramine;
  • erythromycin;
  • antiarrhythmic drugs, such as – amiodarone;
  • non-ionic surfactants, such as – polysorbate 80 and Cetomacrogol 1000;
  • cimetidine;
  • methylcellulose;
  • lutera;
  • calcium chloride;
  • quinine hydrochloride;
  • diamorphine hydrochloride;
  • papaveretum.

Alcoholalcohol

Do not to drink alcohol while taking this medication since alcohol use intensifies certain side effects.

Orajel

It is the brand name of a medication called benzocaine, which is part of a class of medications called local pain relievers or anesthetics.

This local anesthetic works by blocking nerve signals in the body.

It is made by Church & Dwight Co., Inc, an American company that is based in Ewing, New Jersey, USA.

Uses

This medication is used to numb the skin or surfaces inside the mouth, vagina, nose, throat, or rectum to lessen the pain.

Moreover, it is used to reduce pain caused by teething pain, cold sores, canker sores, sunburn, sore throat, minor skin irritations, rectal or vaginal irritation, hemorrhoids, or ingrown toenails.

Dosage

The medication comes in a variety of over-the-counter formulations, which include gels, liquids, swabs, tablets, rinses, ointments, and creams. You make take one dose every 2 hours.

Important note – the US Food and Drug Administration recommends that parents not use this medicine for children younger than 2 years.

Pregnancy

There are no well-controlled studies done in pregnant women to determine the safety of this medication during pregnancy. Tell your healthcare professional if you are pregnant or plan to fall pregnant before using this medication.

In addition, it passes into breast milk and may negatively affect the breastfed baby. Tell your doctor that you are breastfeeding a baby before using this medication.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • mild burning where this local anesthetic was applied;
  • skin redness or tenderness;
  • dry white flakes where the local anesthetic was applied.

Less common side effects may include:

  • fever (high temperature);
  • dark urine;
  • dizziness or lightheadedness;
  • blistering or flaking of the skin;
  • rapid heart rate;
  • difficulties with walking;
  • shortness of breath;
  • redness or stinging of the skin;
  • a sore throat;
  • headaches;
  • unusual weakness or tiredness;
  • difficulties with breathing;
  • unusual bruising or bleeding;
  • pale skin;
  • soreness or swelling of the skin where the medication was applied;
  • fainting;
  • unusual drowsiness or feeling of sluggishness;
  • inability to feel the feet or hands;
  • irritation of the nose;
  • irritability.

Orabase vs Orajel – Which Is Better For Canker Sores & Toothache?

Both brand medications contain the same active ingredient – benzocaine, a local anesthetic. Hence, both medications have similar pain-reducing attributes for a toothache and canker sores pain.

However, in the present day, the US Food and Drug Administration no longer recommends over-the-counter products which contain benzocaine for reducing tooth pain since swallowing this medication (though is rare) can cause methemoglobinemia, a condition in which not enough oxygen is carried in the blood.

Signs and symptoms of methemoglobinemia may include:

  • confusion;
  • shortness of breath;
  • light-headedness;
  • pale or blue-colored lips, skin, and nail beds;
  • fatigue;
  • rapid heart rate;
  • headaches.

The above symptoms can occur within five minutes after medication use. Furthermore, the symptoms can occur after using the local anesthetic for the first time.

Note – if left untreated, due to the insufficient amount of oxygen in the blood, methemoglobinemia may cause injury to the brain and even death.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17138176
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4492630/
http://www.jaypeejournals.com/eJournals/ShowText.aspx

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here