Eligard vs Lupron - Comparison of Side Effects & Uses

Eligard

It is the brand name of a drug called leuprolide, a man-made medication that works by acting in place of LHRH and causes hormone production to be turned off.

Uses

This synthetic hormone regulates many processes in the body and is used in men to treat the symptoms of prostate cancer, the 2nd-most common type of cancer among men in the US.

Prostate cancer occurs when cancer cells form in the prostate. The prostate gland helps produce semen, which is the fluid that contains sperm.

This medication is also used to treat precocious puberty in both female and male children as well as to treat symptoms of uterine fibroids and endometriosis (overgrowth of uterine lining outside of the uterus) in women.

Dosage

The medication is injected subcutaneously, at the healthcare provider’s office or by yourself. It may be given as a daily or monthly dose, depending on the formulation and condition being treated.

Note – it treats only the symptoms of prostate cancer and does not treat the prostate cancer itself.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • mood changes;
  • itching;
  • vaginal itching, swelling, or discharge;
  • rash;
  • weight gain;
  • acne;
  • breakthrough bleeding;
  • sweating;
  • pain where the shot was given;
  • headaches;
  • decreased testicle size;
  • hot flashes.

Rare side effects may include:

  • a seizure;
  • loss of movement in any part of your body;
  • a dry cough or hack;
  • bone pain;
  • wheezing;
  • rapid weight gain;
  • painful or difficult urination;
  • swelling;
  • loss of bowel or bladder control;
  • unusual changes in mood or behavior;
  • increased thirst;
  • sudden chest pain or discomfort;
  • muscle weakness;
  • fruity breath odor;
  • slurred speech;
  • increased urination;
  • pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder;
  • tingly feeling in your legs or feet;
  • chest pain or pressure;
  • unusual sensations in your back;
  • a purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling;
  • sudden numbness or weakness.

To make sure that this medication is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had:

  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • psychosis;
  • blood vessel disorder;
  • an electrolyte imbalance;
  • a brain tumor;
  • depression;
  • long QT syndrome;
  • risk factors for bone loss;
  • congestive heart failure;
  • heart disease.

Lupron

It is the brand name of a medication called leuprolide, that belongs to a group of medications called GnRH agonists. It works by decreasing the production of certain hormones in the body, especially reducing the amount of testosterone.

It is manufactured by Abbvie Endocrine (formerly Abbott Pharmaceuticals). The US Food and Drug Administration originally approved this GnRH agonist in 1996.

Uses

This prescription medication is used to improve anemia caused by uterine fibroids, manage endometriosis, and treat symptoms of advanced prostate cancer.

Dosage

The usual recommended dose is 3.75 milligrams every month or 45 mg every six months.

Side Effects and Precautions

Common side effects may include:

  • itching;
  • mood changes;
  • rash;
  • general pain;
  • acne;
  • vaginal swelling, itching, or discharge;
  • hot flashes;
  • swelling where the shot was given;
  • breakthrough bleeding;
  • headaches;
  • decreased testicle size;
  • weight gain.

Rare side effects may include:

  • rapid weight gain;
  • loss of movement in any part of your body;
  • a seizure;
  • bone pain;
  • a dry cough or hack;
  • unusual changes in mood or behavior;
  • painful or difficult urination;
  • sudden chest pain or discomfort;
  • increased urination;
  • pain or unusual sensations in your back;
  • fruity breath odor;
  • loss of bowel or bladder control;
  • increased thirst;
  • pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder;
  • tingly feeling in your legs or feet;
  • sudden severe headache;
  • muscle weakness or loss of use;
  • swelling in your face or tongue.

To make sure that this GnRH agonist is safe for you, tell your healthcare provider if you have ever had:

  • blood vessel disorder;
  • mental illness;
  • long QT syndrome;
  • seizures or epilepsy;
  • depression;
  • congestive heart failure;
  • a brain tumor;
  • an electrolyte imbalance;
  • heart disease;
  • risk factors for bone loss.

Alcohol

Do not consume alcohol while taking this GnRH agonist since alcohol can increase the risk of side effects, especially upset stomach, nausea, and dizziness.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

There are no well-done studies to determine whether this GnRH agonist passes into breast milk, however, healthcare providers warn against taking this medication while breastfeeding a baby.

In addition, pregnant women shouldn’t take this GnRH agonist since it may cause birth defects.

Drug Interactions

It may negatively interact with other medications, especially:

  • Fareston (toremifene);
  • opdivo;
  • AIDS/HIV medications, like – saquinavir (Invirase);
  • restasis;
  • Multaq (dronedarone);
  • naltrexone;
  • antibiotics, like – moxifloxacin (Avelox), clarithromycin (Biaxin), or azithromycin (Zithromax, Zmax);
  • butatrans;
  • Orap (pimozide);
  • pain medications, like – hydrocodone (Zohydro ER) or methadone (Methadose, Doloquin);
  • antidepressants, such as – amitriptyline (Elavil) and citalopram (Celexa);
  • antipsychotic medications, like – quetiapine (Seroquel) and ziprasidone (Geodon);
  • drugs for irregular heartbeats, like – amiodarone (Cordarone, Nexterone) or sotalol (Sorine, Betapace AF).

Bottom Line – Eligard vs Lupron

Eligard (active ingredient – leuprolide) is used in men to treat the symptoms of prostate cancer. It works by reducing the amount of testosterone in men or estrogen in women.

Lupron (active ingredient – leuprolide) is used in men to treat the symptoms of prostate cancer as well as in women to treat symptoms of endometriosis or uterine fibroids. It works by reducing the amount of testosterone in men or estrogen in women.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4107255/
https://www.medscape.org/viewarticle/438957_4
http://www.medsafe.govt.nz/profs/Datasheet/e/Eligardinj.pdf

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